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How Much Money Do Teachers Make? 5 Factors That Influence Teachers’ Salaries

Reviewed by Jon Konen, District Superintendent

As professionals entrusted with the physical, emotional, and intellectual well-being of our children, it’s safe to say that teachers deserve every penny of their salaries… and then some. But do teachers make good money? How much you’ll earn as a teacher is dependent upon several factors – probably even more than you would have ever guessed.

Teacher salaries vary significantly by state, city, and even school district. Budgets, school district size, and cost of living all play a part in how much money teachers make. It also makes a difference whether you start by earning your full teaching degree or instead decide to become a paraprofessional to first get experience in the classroom.

So how much money does a teacher make a year, given the various factors that apply? Whether you want to become an elementary school teacher or become a high school teacher, here are the top 5 factors to help you understand how much teachers are earning and how to maximize your earning power in this rewarding profession.

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National Teacher Salary Averages vs. Top-Paying States

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides a solid overview of what today’s teachers are earning at each level, as of May 2020. It’s universally accepted that teachers generally deserve far more than they usually earn, but can teachers make $100K? The answer is yes, with the right education and time put into the classroom.

Your salary will differ based on your level of experience—new teachers will earn closer to the 25th percentile, while veteran teachers with a master’s degree and national certification will enjoy a salary closer to the 90th percentile. It also matters whether you want to become a preschool teacher, work with middle school students, or even enter special education.

How much money does a teacher make a year based on these factors? Here’s an overview of average salaries for each kind of teacher, along with which states currently offer the top salaries for educators.

Preschool teachers:

  • National average: $36,550
    • 25th percentile: $26,220
    • 50th percentile: $31,930
    • 75th percentile: $42,350
    • 90th percentile: $58,230
  • Top paid states:
    • New Jersey: $47,190
    • Washington, D.C.: $45,890
    • New York: $44,760
    • Massachusetts: $43,120

Special education preschool teachers:

  • National average: $68,110
    • 25th percentile: $46,320
    • 50th percentile: $61,400
    • 75th percentile: $82,820
    • 90th percentile: $115,020
  • Top paid states:
    • New York: $91,760
    • Oregon: $87,300
    • Montana: $72,140
    • New Jersey: $71,260

Elementary school teachers:

  • National average: $65,420
    • 25th percentile: $48,350
    • 50th percentile: $60,940
    • 75th percentile: $79,120
    • 90th percentile: $100,480
  • Top paid states:
    • California: $85,110
    • Massachusetts: $84,810
    • New York: $84,380
    • Connecticut: $79,610

Special education kindergarten and elementary teachers:

  • National average: $64,420
    • 25th percentile: $48,860
    • 50th percentile: $60,620
    • 75th percentile: $77,580
    • 90th percentile: $98,480
  • Top paid states:
    • Oregon: $79,070
    • New York: $78,710
    • Connecticut: $78,090
    • California: $78,070

Middle school teachers:

  • National average: $64,990
    • 25th percentile: $48,870
    • 50th percentile: $60,810
    • 75th percentile: $77,880
    • 90th percentile: $98,840
  • Top paid states:
    • New York: $89,150
    • Massachusetts: $82,610
    • California: $81,940
    • Connecticut: $81,140

Special education middle school teachers:

  • National average: $66,300
    • 25th percentile: $50,360
    • 50th percentile: $61,820
    • 75th percentile: $79,190
    • 90th percentile: $99,750
  • Top paid states:
    • New York: $90,960
    • Connecticut: $82,990
    • Washington, D.C.: $81,380
    • Oregon: $79,850

High school teachers:

  • National average: $67,340
    • 25th percentile: $49,990
    • 50th percentile: $62,870
    • 75th percentile: $81,410
    • 90th percentile: $102,130
  • Top paid states:
    • New York: $88,890
    • California: $86,900
    • Massachusetts: $84,130
    • New Jersey: $78,900

Special education high school teachers:

  • National average: $66,490
    • 25th percentile: $49,940
    • 50th percentile: $62,320
    • 75th percentile: $80,210
    • 90th percentile: $101,050
  • Top paid states:
    • New York: $84,370
    • Washington, D.C.: $82,440
    • Maryland: $82,280
    • California: $82,250

Substitute teachers:

  • National average: $ 36,090
    • 25th percentile: $23,390
    • 50th percentile: $29,370
    • 75th percentile: $38,160
    • 90th percentile: $51,850
  • Top paid states:
    • Hawaii: $46,170
    • Massachusetts: $45,460
    • Oregon: $45,190
    • California: $43,370

Teacher Salaries by Metro Area

What do 2021 teachers earn where you live? The following salary ranges (50th – 90th percentiles) highlight what teachers in some of the nation’s largest metro areas are earning as of May 2020, which is the latest data compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. For details on salaries in your specific area, see the BLS’ comprehensive list.

Phoenix, Arizona (including Mesa and Scottsdale)

  • Preschool teachers: $29,870 – $48,160
  • Elementary school teachers: $47,800 – $67,260
  • Middle school teachers: $46,730 – $64,050
  • High school teachers: $54,190 – $79,090
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $49,320 – $66,940
    • Elementary school: $48,640 – $68,020
    • Middle school: $47,000 – $66,210
    • High school: $53,760 – $76,020

Los Angeles, California (including Long Beach and Anaheim)

  • Preschool teachers: $32,760 – $63,660
  • Elementary school teachers: $92,480 – $125,810
  • Middle school teachers: $91,670 – $112,960
  • High school teachers: $88,850 – $116,250
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $47,010 – $103,630
    • Elementary school: $78,330 – $119,420
    • Middle school: $86,510 – $109,650
    • High school: $79,520 – $109,680

Denver, Colorado (including Aurora and Lakewood)

  • Preschool teachers: $34,360 – $63,610
  • Elementary school teachers: $58,150 – $83,360
  • Middle school teachers: $56,650 – $83,000
  • High school teachers: $60,440 – $86,890
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $61,730 – $89,220
    • Elementary school: $58,580 – $82,710
    • Middle school: $58,650 – $83,210
    • High school: $61,400 – $83,960

 

Washington, D.C. (including Arlington and Alexandria, VA)

  • Preschool teachers: $34,670 – $57,870
  • Elementary school teachers: $83,340 – $129,010
  • Middle school teachers: $86,070 – $128,970
  • High school teachers: $84,290 – $133,110
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $94,970 – $129,340
    • Elementary school: $79,650 – $127,640
    • Middle school: $74,420 – $119,860
    • High school: $93,250 – $133,910

Atlanta, Georgia (including Sandy Springs and Roswell)

  • Preschool teachers: $28,830 – $54,760
  • Elementary school teachers: $62,880 – $82,640
  • Middle school teachers: $61,970 – $87,790
  • High school teachers: $63,090 – $83,270
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $58,090 – $79,540
    • Elementary school: $63,240 – $87,050
    • Middle school: $63,610 – $92,560
    • High school: $60,300 – $80,510

Chicago, Illinois (including Naperville and Elgin)

  • Preschool teachers: $31,540 – $52,690
  • Elementary school teachers: $65,970 – $103,990
  • Middle school teachers: $64,750 – $102,890
  • High school teachers: $79,910 – $128,010
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $53,870 – $92,140
    • Elementary school: $65,250 – $104,070
    • Middle school: $65,620 – $101,900
    • High school: $72,820 – $116,860

New Orleans, Louisiana (including Metairie)

  • Preschool teachers: $29,430 – $46,760
  • Elementary school teachers: $49,860 – $63,900
  • Middle school teachers: $50,320 – $63,220
  • High school teachers: $53,430 – $73,160
  • Special education teachers
    • Elementary school: $50,380 – $63,300
    • Middle school: $52,790 – $63,750
    • High school: $52,980 – $64,610

Boston, Massachusetts (including Cambridge, MA and Nashua, NH)

  • Preschool teachers: $38,320 – $60,320
  • Elementary school teachers: $84,550 – $124,890
  • Middle school teachers: $81,060 – $112,600
  • High school teachers: $83,390 – $115,630
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $61,370 – $110,440
    • Elementary school: $76,170 – $115,150
    • Middle school: $76,810 – $109,520
    • High school: $76,660 – $107,930

Detroit, Michigan (including Warren and Dearborn)

  • Preschool teachers: $27,600 – $59,150
  • Elementary school teachers: $75,130 – $104,640
  • Middle school teachers: $65,850 – $95,730
  • High school teachers: $65,080 – $95,030
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $73,520 – $82,610
    • Elementary school: $63,770 – $94,080
    • Middle school: $61,480 – $94,430
    • High school: $70,160 – $84,170

Minneapolis, Minnesota (includes St. Paul and Bloomington)

  • Preschool teachers: $38,100 – $53,840
  • Elementary school teachers: $63,090 – $97,030
  • Middle school teachers: $59,850 – $101,080
  • High school teachers: $64,740 – $97,100
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $65,140 – $101,280
    • Elementary school: $59,210 – $86,750
    • Middle school: $63,510 – $96,190
    • High school: $62,670 – $103,120

Kansas City, Missouri

  • Preschool teachers: $35,130 – $61,680
  • Elementary school teachers: $55,120 – $87,110
  • Middle school teachers: $53,280 – $90,860
  • High school teachers: $49,470 – $83,020
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $63,180 – $91,850
    • Elementary school: $58,360 – $88,370
    • Middle school: $56,450 – $85,110
    • High school: $51,570 – $77,300

New York City, New York (including Newark and Jersey City, NJ)

  • Preschool teachers: $43,030 – $77,130
  • Elementary school teachers: $81,150 – $131,560
  • Middle school teachers: $85,790 – $131,790
  • High school teachers: $89,620 – $132,510
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $81,920 – $156,290
    • Elementary school: $76,290 – $123,650
    • Middle school: $85,460 – $128,410
    • High school: $83,950 – $127,350

Charlotte North Carolina (including Concord and Gastonia)

  • Preschool teachers: $25,900 – $36,910
  • Elementary school teachers: $52,630 – $75,590
  • Middle school teachers: $52,810 – $70,920
  • High school teachers: $52,710 – $74,620
  • Special education teachers
    • Elementary school: $53,120 – $70,400
    • Middle school: $55,240 – $74,320
    • High school: $53,330 – $66,670

Columbus, Ohio

  • Preschool teachers: $30,270 – $48,000
  • Elementary school teachers: $65,380 – $97,010
  • Middle school teachers: $60,150 – $95,920
  • High school teachers: $71,670 – $99,740
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $77,210 – $105,860
    • Elementary school: $58,050 – $86,210
    • Middle school: $64,120 – $87,350
    • High school: $63,330 – $92,880

Portland, Oregon (including Vancouver, WA, and Hillsboro, OR)

  • Preschool teachers: $32,610 – $45,700
  • Elementary school teachers: $77,540 – $117,690
  • Middle school teachers: $68,450 – $101,790
  • High school teachers: $81,640 – $114,690
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $90,670 – $134,110
    • Elementary school: $80,430 – $118,230
    • Middle school: $77,030 – $120,420
    • High school: $85,440 – $124,330

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (including Camden, NJ and Wilmington, DE)

  • Preschool teachers: $29,590 – $48,100
  • Elementary school teachers: $68,480 – $103,010
  • Middle school teachers: $69,910 – $111,130
  • High school teachers: $69,060 – $105,720
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $70,190 – $100,800
    • Elementary school: $65,300 – $95,200
    • Middle school: $70,070 – $102,450
    • High school: $70,390 – $101,480

Nashville, Tennessee (including Davidson, Murfreesboro, and Franklin)

  • Preschool teachers: $29,470 – $52,160
  • Elementary school teachers: $50,740 – $72,930
  • Middle school teachers: $50,580 – $73,060
  • High school teachers: $50,260 – $72,740
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $43,370 – $65,340
    • Elementary school: $49,960 – $67,360
    • Middle school: $55,190 – $72,110
    • High school: $56,790 – $82,540

Houston, Texas (including the Woodlands and Sugar Land)

  • Preschool teachers: $42,010 – $68,790
  • Elementary school teachers: $59,590 – $68,830
  • Middle school teachers: $59,540 – $69,280
  • High school teachers: $60,480 – $74,820
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $48,440 – $64,320
    • Elementary school: $59,800 – $70,860
    • Middle school: $59,660 – $68,270
    • High school: $60,360 – $74,100

Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Preschool teachers: $27,050 – $34,320
  • Elementary school teachers: $51,800 – $89,340
  • Middle school teachers: $68,820 – $98,880
  • High school teachers: $58,670 – $87,970
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $52,450 – $63,610
    • Elementary school: $52,480 – $90,040
    • Middle school: $73,700 – $99,270
    • High school: $30,860 – $64,530

Seattle, Washington (including Tacoma and Bellevue)

  • Preschool teachers: $34,690 – $49,590
  • Elementary school teachers: $74,120 – $105,360
  • Middle school teachers: $76,490 – $106,860
  • High school teachers: $78,250 – $107,010
  • Special education teachers
    • Preschool: $68,900 – $102,680
    • Elementary school: $71,270 – $101,770
    • Middle school: $75,310 – $104,570
    • High school: $75,990 – $105,550

1. Location and Local Tax Levies

Where you teach will play a big part in answering the question – how much money do teachers make? You’ll find significant differences in pay for teachers from one state to the next, between different cities in the same state, and even from one school district to the next. But how is that possible if salaries are negotiated through the national teacher’s union?

While public schools receive funds from local, state, and federal sources, the majority of funding comes from local property taxes. Therefore, school districts in wealthier communities tend to have larger school budgets (higher property values = more taxes), which in turn means higher pay for teachers. But the formula for those higher salaries is always about adjusting for a higher cost of living expenses.

You see, teachers are all paid on a standard “step and lane” salary schedule that ensures that all educators with the same tenure and education teaching at the same grade level earn the same salary. You won’t find a situation where a high school teacher with a master’s dramatically out-earns another high school teacher with the same degree. Any noticeable difference in pay is almost always to off-set a higher cost of living in different parts of the country.

Where the cost of living is lower than the national average, a teacher’s salary can take you much further than it does in a state where the cost of living is much higher than the national average. In other words, don’t take teacher salaries at face value, because the numbers can be deceiving.

For example, based on current cost of living estimates, a $40,000 teacher’s salary in Boise, ID, is equivalent to a teacher’s salary of $51,144 in Las Vegas, NV, and a $35,000 salary in Birmingham, AL, is equivalent to a salary of $86,047 in Los Angeles, CA. Answering the question “How much money does a teacher make a year?” involves a more nuanced understanding of things than it might appear at first glance.

2. Whether You Teach in a Public or Private School

How much money do teachers make working in private vs. public schools? Supported by federal, state, and local resources, public schools generally offer higher salaries to teachers than private schools.

Private schools are typically supported only by tuition or fundraising efforts, as is sometimes the case in religious schools where students may receive state-funded education benefits instead of conventional tuition payments. Some well-known private schools, such as Montessori schools, can charge higher tuition rates that result in larger teacher salaries. Other private schools, such as teaching collectives, aren’t conducive to teachers being able to negotiate for higher pay and benefits. Even in states that make funds available to individual private school students, the teacher salaries don’t typically match what public school teachers are earning.

That’s not to say that working outside of public school districts doesn’t have its advantages. Small class sizes provide more opportunities to connect and interact with their students while teaching in a school environment that operates outside of strict state and federal guidelines afford more flexibility to design and implement curricula that best match their students’ needs and interests.

How much do teachers make in roles outside of the classroom altogether? Happily, there are plenty of opportunities to put your knowledge and love of teaching to use that don’t necessarily involve chalk and a blackboard. Teachers working in educational support services are the other top earners in this field. Educators working in educational support services oversee course/curriculum design and implementation and generally work for state and local governments.

The BLS provides an overview of average salaries for teachers, according to the setting in which they work:

Preschool teachers

  • Elementary and secondary schools: $48,410
  • Religious organizations: $33,030
  • Child daycare services: $29,860
  • Individual and family services: $34,420

Elementary school teachers

  • Elementary and secondary schools: $60,880
  • Religious organizations: $51,440
  • Child daycare services: $36,960
  • Educational support services: $51,900

Middle school teachers

  • Elementary and secondary schools: $64,970
  • Religious organizations: $62,920
  • Educational support services: $56,280
  • Residential care facilities: $42,850

High school teachers

  • Elementary and secondary schools: $67,360
  • Religious organizations: $70,580
  • Educational support services: $60,000
  • Residential care facilities: $50,220

Special education teachers, preschool

  • Elementary and secondary schools: $65,590
  • Other schools and instruction: $71,580
  • Child daycare services: $83,070
  • Individual and family services: $72,620

Special education teachers, kindergarten and elementary

  • Elementary and secondary schools: $64,690
  • Residential care facilities: $59,100
  • Educational support services: $80,670
  • Individual and family services: $84,510

Special education teachers, middle school

  • Elementary and secondary schools: $66,300
  • Educational support services: $67,800
  • Residential intellectual and developmental disability, mental health, and substance abuse facilities: $56,860

Special education teachers, secondary school

  • Elementary and secondary schools: $66,790
  • Residential care facilities: $63,810
  • Psychiatric and substance abuse hospitals: $62,290
  • Educational support services: $52,360

3. Level of Education

Moving beyond the standard bachelor’s degree and state licensure is one of the most effective ways to earn a bigger salary.

About one-third of all states recognize advanced licenses and higher salaries for those who earn a master’s degree or higher—and three states (Connecticut, Maryland, and New York) even require a master’s to maintain your teaching license.

According to a 2019 National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) study of 124 large school districts, 92% of all districts paid their teachers more for holding an advanced degree. About 58% of these districts have pay increases for master’s degrees built into their salary schedules, while about 33% pay their teachers with advanced degrees an annual stipend or bonus.

So how much do teachers make additionally with a graduate degree? According to the NCTQ, a teacher salary with a master’s degree is an average of $5,285 more annually than teachers with strictly a bachelor’s. This means that over the course of a teacher’s career, a master’s-prepared educator will make an average of nearly $160,000 more than one with a bachelor’s degree.

In some districts, the difference in pay among bachelor’s and master’s-prepared teachers is significant. For example:

(Min-max difference in annual pay between a teacher with a BA and a teacher with an MA)

  • Billings Public Schools (Billings, MT): $8,430 – $14,784
  • Bismarck Public Schools (Bismarck, ND): $5,144 – $26,762
  • District of Columbia Public Schools: $3,680 – $20,476
  • Fairfax County Public School (Reston, Herndon VA): $5,628 – $21,725
  • Granite School District (Salt Lake City, UT): $4,301 – $10,623
  • Montgomery County Public Schools (Columbia, MD): $4,984 – $36,716
  • Omaha Public Schools (Omaha, NE): $4,100 -$10,660
  • Portland Public Schools (Portland, OR): $7,847 – $11,727
  • Santa Ana Unified School District (Santa Ana, CA): $1,565 – $48,854
  • Seattle Public Schools (Seattle, WA): $8,945 – $20,712
  • Springfield Public School District (Springfield, MO): $3,830 – $17,178
  • Anchorage School District (Anchorage, AK): $5,458 – $12,101
  • Anne Arundel County Public Schools (Annapolis, MD): $3,754 – $24,719
  • Baltimore County Public Schools (Baltimore, MD): $1,108 – $36,364
  • Burlington School District (Burlington, VT): $7,114 – $18,743

4. Financial Benefits of National Board Certification

One of the last—and most important—factors in determining how much money do teachers make is whether they’re nationally certified in addition to the state certification they’re required to hold. National Board Certification serves as the highest nationally recognized credential in K-12 public school teaching and indicates that a teacher has met the profession’s highest standards. To qualify for this designation, you must have a bachelor’s degree, a valid state teaching license, and at least three years of teaching experience.

National Board Certification is available in 25 certificate areas that represent 16 different disciplines and four developmental levels. Being a designated National Board-Certified Teacher (NBCT) not only positions you among the most highly qualified teachers in the field, it also often comes with financial perks. In fact, about half of all states offer salary incentives to encourage teachers to pursue National Board Certification.

Most states reward NBCTs with an annual stipend, while a few offer standard pay increases. And in many states, NBCTs working in high-needs areas or schools receive a larger stipend:

  • Alabama: $5,000 annual stipend, with an additional $5,000 for NBCTs in high-needs areas
  • Arkansas:
    • $2,500 annual stipend for NBCTs for 5 years
    • $5,000 for NBCTs teaching in a high-poverty school not located in a high-poverty district (5 years)
    • $10,000 for NBCTs teaching in a high-poverty school in a high-poverty district (10 years)
  • Colorado: $1,600 annual stipend, with an additional $3,200 for NBCTs in high needs schools
  • Delaware: 12% salary supplement
  • Hawaii: $5,000 annual stipend, with an additional $5,000 for NBCTs in high-needs schools
  • Iowa: $2,500 annual stipend (for a term of 10 years)
  • Idaho: $2,000 annual stipend (for a term of 5 years)
  • Kansas: $1,000 annual stipend
  • Kentucky: $2,000 annual stipend
  • Maine: $3,000 annual stipend, with an additional $5,000 for NBCTs working in districts where at least 50% of the students qualify for free or reduced lunches
  • Maryland: State to match $1,000 from districts annually, and an additional $1,000 for NBCTs in high-needs schools
  • Mississippi: $6,000 annual stipend and an additional $4,000 for NBCTs in 16 counties
  • Montana: $2,500 annual stipend for NBCTs in high-needs schools; $1,500 stipend for all other NBCTs (both stipends contingent upon district contribution of $500)
  • Nevada: 5% annual salary increase
  • New Mexico: $5,800 annual stipend
  • North Carolina: $12% above base pay
  • Oklahoma: Up to $1,000 annually
  • South Dakota: $2,000 annual stipend for at least 5 years
  • Utah: $2,000 annually for NBCTs in Title I Schools; $1,000 annually for all other NBCTs
  • Virginia: Initial award of $5,000, subsequent $2,500 annually
  • Washington: $5,505 annual stipend, with an additional $5,000 for NBCTs in high needs schools
  • West Virginia: $3,500 annual stipend, with an additional $2,000 for NBCTs in low-performing schools
  • Wisconsin: $2,500 annual stipend for the first year, with an additional $2,500 annually for NBCTs in high needs schools
  • Wyoming: $4,000 annual stipend

In other states, National Board Certification designation counts toward licensure renewal or an advanced teaching license. For example, in Florida, National Board Certification counts toward obtaining or renewing a Professional Certification, while in Kentucky, it provides a path toward a Rank I Professional Certificate.

Learn more about National Board Certification recognition and current financial incentives in your state.

5. Other Financial Incentives for Educators Teaching in Teacher Shortage Areas

While the subject and grade level in which you teach won’t play a huge part in how much money a teacher makes a year, in many school districts, you’ll earn an annual stipend, signing bonus, or even student loan repayment if you teach in a subject that’s been designated as a teacher shortage area. Teacher shortage areas may be in a particular teacher license field, an economic development region within the state, or a teacher license field within an economic development region.

The teacher shortage in the U.S. is reaching unprecedented heights. According to the Economic Policy Institute, there was a shortage of 110,000 teachers in the U.S. in 2018, and by 2025, this number could reach 200,000.

According to the U.S. Department of Education database of U.S. teacher shortages, 45 states and Washington D.C. experienced special education teacher shortages in the 2020-21 school year, either in specific grades/special education areas or statewide. School districts in low socio-economic areas are affected most by teacher shortages.

Teaching an approved teacher shortage subject and/or in high-needs area may allow you to take advantage of loan forgiveness programs available at the federal and state levels, which can ultimately have a large effect on understanding how much money teachers make.

At the federal level, the TEACH (Teacher Education Assistants for College and Higher Education) Grant Program provides grants of up to $4,000 per year for students who agree to teach in a high-need field (such as special education, math, and science) that serves students from low-income families.

The Teacher Forgiveness Program also provides up to $17,500 in loan repayment for teachers with Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans. To qualify, you must be employed full-time as a highly qualified teacher for five consecutive years at an elementary school, secondary school, or educational service agency serving low-income students.

Many states also offer loan repayment programs in teacher shortage or other high-demand areas. For example, Minnesota’s Teacher Shortage Loan Repayment Program pays up to $1,000 in annual loan repayment assistance (up to $5,000 total) to educators teaching in a statewide teaching shortage area. Check with your state’s education agency to learn more about tuition grants and loan repayment incentives available in your state.

At the local level, school districts may also offer specific financial incentives such as signing bonuses and annual stipends for teachers assuming or remaining in areas designated as teacher shortage areas.

Becoming a Teacher Changes Lives

At the end of the day, answering “how much do teachers make” isn’t black and white, but it all starts with getting the right education. Earning your bachelor’s degree in education or early childhood education gets you well on your way to earning a solid salary—and more importantly, making a huge impact in young lives. Start your journey today by finding an education degree program in your state.